Modern Language

The Modern Language Program at Loyola Blakefield has been designed to meet the needs of students at varying levels of academic ability. Thus, the department offers both standard college preparatory courses and an honors program in modern foreign language. In both programs, however, the general goals and objectives of the department are to provide for an oral/aural comprehension level commensurate with the student’s ability, to instill a basic mastery of the vocabulary and structure of the language and to cultivate in the student an understanding of and appreciation for the cultures of the people who speak the language. The department views communication in an oral and written form in the modern foreign language as its ultimate goal.

All Modern Language students regularly utilize the Language Lab, which allows them to engage in interactive communicative exercises in their target language.

Loyola Blakefield requires its students to complete three levels of the same modern foreign language. As Loyola’s middle school students complete level one over the course of the seventh and eighth grades, they are required to complete at least two additional levels in grades nine and ten. All incoming students who have studied a foreign language at other schools are given the opportunity to take a placement test. As a result of their achievement on this placement test, some students may need to begin their study of a foreign language at Loyola’s level one. Others may be admitted into the second level of their language and thus would be required to complete only levels two and three.

Students who complete the three level modern language requirement by the end of grade ten or eleven are strongly encouraged to continue studying their language at advanced levels through elective courses. Doing so will remove or reduce the gap between their study of modern language in high school and college.

Students achieving a grade of “B” or better may, with departmental approval, take a course in a second modern language.

Available Courses

Items with (*) are electives

Grade 6

Modern Language

The Modern Language Program at Loyola Blakefield has been designed to meet the needs of students at varying levels of academic ability. All Modern Language students regularly utilize the Language Lab, which allows them to engage ininteractive communicative exercises in their target language. Loyola Blakefield requires its students to complete three levels of the same modern foreign language while students begin considering their language of choice in grade six. As Loyola’s middle school students complete level one over the course of the seventh and eighth grades, they are required to complete at least two additional levels in grades nine and ten.

Grade 7

Modern Language

The Modern Language Program at Loyola Blakefield has been designed to meet the needs of students at varying levels of academic ability. All Modern Language students regularly utilize the Language Lab, which allows them to engage in interactive communicative exercises in their target language. Loyola Blakefield requires its students to complete three levels of the same modern foreign language. As Loyola’s middle school students complete level one over the course of the seventh and eighth grades, they are required to complete at least two additional levels in grades nine and ten.

Grade 8

Modern Language

The Modern Language Program at Loyola Blakefield has been designed to meet the needs of students at varying levels of academic ability. All Modern Language students regularly utilize the Language Lab, which allows them to engage in interactive communicative exercises in their target language. Loyola Blakefield requires its students to complete three levels of the same modern foreign language. As Loyola’s middle school students complete level one over the course of the seventh and eighth grades, they are required to complete at least two additional levels in grades nine and ten.

Available Courses

Items with (*) are electives

French

French IV Honors

This course is designed to apply all the skills learned during the first three years. Students will engage in a thorough review of French grammar and will read selections from plays, poetry, newspapers, short stories, and also read the novel Au Revoir les Enfants as well as view the film. They will engage in listening exercises with native speakers recorded on CDs and tape and will transcribe song lyrics from CDs of the great French singers Edith Piaf, Jacques Brel and Charles Aznavour. French culture will be thoroughly integrated in the course.

AP French Langugage and Culture

This course is the equivalent of a “French Composition and Conversation” class, which is typically taken in the fifth semester of collegiate language studies. The course is designed to help students achieve a high level of proficiency in the areas of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. By succeeding in this, the students will be prepared for the Advanced Placement Examination in French Language and Culture, which is administered in May. In addition to reviewing and refining subtle grammar points and increasing their vocabulary, students will practice their listening skills by exposure to the speech of native speakers. They will narrate stories and speak about complex and advanced themes such as those found on the examination. They will read various genres including novels, plays, poems essays, song lyrics, and newspaper articles. They will write often and on a variety of themes so as to be able to form cogent and sophisticated essays. This class is conduced entirely in French.

German

German II

After a brief review of the first level material, new vocabulary and grammar points are taught. These elements are stressed in conversation and short writing assignments. Readings and discussions reinforce contemporary German and engage the students in applying new grammar structures.

German II Honors

A thorough review of level one precedes treatment of new vocabulary and grammar on an intermediate level. New grammatical concepts include use of mixed prepositions, the simple past tense, subordinate clauses and adjective endings. Students apply the new vocabulary and grammar while working in pairs or small groups. Writing skills are developed through use of the workbook accompanying the text.

German III

At the beginning of this course, students review major elements of the first two levels- cases of nouns, verb tenses and word order. Additional grammar structures are learned and reinforced in conversation. Basic vocabulary is extended through the reading and discussion of short fictional works and the occasional magazine or newspaper article.

German III Honors

Major grammar points of previous levels are reviewed and reinforced as needed. The use of passive voice and subjunctive mood is included. Situational drills and group work involve students in applying newly acquired vocabulary and grammar. Readings, including a short mystery novel and occasional magazine and newspaper articles, provide contemporary themes for discussion and written work.

German IV

In this course the four language skills are developed on an advanced level. Original themes are assigned to be written on a specific topic and require certain grammar and vocabulary words which have been prepared in advance. Grammar points which emerge as problematic in written themes are re-addressed and fine points are stressed. Attention is given to idiomatic expressions. Students read a full-length drama and this serves both as a topic for discussion and as the theme of some written essays. Additional readings are taken from anthologies and newspapers and magazines. Students have access to the internet in retrieving information on current events. Recorded passages on CD, cassette or video increase listening comprehension skills. Students speak to the class about daily routines and recent experiences or describe the story portrayed in a series of pictures. Seniors enrolled in this course may, with the recommendation of the instructor, take the German Language Advanced Placement Examination.

German IV Honors

In this course the four language skills are developed on an advanced level. Original themes are assigned to be written on a specific topic and require certain grammar and vocabulary words which have been prepared in advance. Grammar points which emerge as problematic in written themes are re-addressed and fine points are stressed. Attention is given to idiomatic expressions. Students read a full-length drama and this serves both as a topic for discussion and as the theme of some written essays. Additional readings are taken from anthologies and newspapers and magazines. Students have access to the internet in retrieving information on current events. Recorded passages on CD, cassette or video increase listening comprehension skills. Students speak to the class about daily routines and recent experiences or describe the story portrayed in a series of pictures. Seniors enrolled in this course may, with the recommendation of the instructor, take the German Language Advanced Placement Examination.

AP German Language and Culture

This course prepares students for the successful completion of the German Language and Culture Advanced Placement Examination. It is a logical continuation of the four-skills approach outlined in the description of the German IV Honors class above. Each skill is honed to a higher degree, with the expectation that students will gradually incorporate an ever wider variety of grammatical forms, vocabulary and idiomatic expressions in their speaking and writing, Qualified students read a novel during the summer preceding the course and at least one full-length drama during the course. Ample opportunities are provided for oral expression in the class and for written themes both in and outside of class time.

Spanish

Spanish I

In these courses, students begin to develop the four basic skills of language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students are introduced to basic vocabulary and grammatical structures and are able, in a limited way, to express themselves orally and in writing in the present tense. Aspects of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world will be presented. Performance-based activities and assessments will be integrated into the program, which has as its goal the development of communicative competence.

Spanish I Honors

In these courses, students begin to develop the four basic skills of language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students are introduced to basic vocabulary and grammatical structures and are able, in a limited way, to express themselves orally and in writing in the present tense. Aspects of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world will be presented. Performance-based activities and assessments will be integrated into the program, which has as its goal the development of communicative competence.

Spanish II

Spanish II begins with thorough review of Spanish I. Students learn to express themselves in the preterite and imperfect tenses and begin to use more complex grammatical structures. They develop a larger vocabulary to address familiar topics such as jobs, traveling, foods, the weekend, and social situations. They listen to native speakers on CDs and continue their study of the cultures of the Spanish- speaking world. Performance-based activities and assessments will be integrated into the program.

Spanish II Honors

After a thorough review of Spanish I, students will learn to express themselves in the preterite, imperfect, present and past perfects, the imperatives and the simple future. They begin to use more complex grammatical structures including pronouns, negative expressions, comparisons of adjectives, demonstratives and adverbs. Their vocabulary expands to address a wider variety of topics including jobs, travel, food, shopping, and weather. The use of CDs and videos gives students the opportunity to listen to the speech of native speakers. Students are given increased opportunities to practice their writing and speaking skills using performance-based and communicative-based activities and assessments and they continue to learn more about culture in the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish III

Spanish III is a continuation and refinement of Spanish II. Students learn to express themselves in the remaining simple tenses and by using more complex grammatical structures. Their vocabulary continues to expand to permit increased mastery of the four skills. They continue their study of culture of the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish III Honors

Spanish III Honors offers students the opportunity to synthesize the grammatical and lexical concepts taught in previous years. As such, they expand their ability to communicate in both written and spoken forms. Grammar taught in previous years is reviewed thoroughly with a special emphasis on the subtleties of the language. Students continue their study of the history and culture of the Spanish-speaking world, which includes an introduction to reading and analyzing prose and poetry. The four language skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking assume increased importance. This class in conducted almost entirely in Spanish.

Spanish IV

Spanish IV is the continuation of Spanish III. After a thorough grammatical review, more advanced topics are introduced. In Spanish IV, students continue to develop each of the four skills toward achieving the goal of increased ability to communicate. Students are exposed to a greater variety of reading assignments which include: dialogs, cultural essays, and newspaper articles. They will continue to develop listening skills by frequent use of CDs and videos. This class in conducted entirely in Spanish.

Spanish IV Honors

This course is designed to apply all the skills learned during the first three years. Students will review the grammar and learn some more advanced grammatical topics. A greater emphasis will be placed on reading, as students will read a novel, poetry, short stories, excerpts from plays and newspaper articles. They will use the Internet to keep informed about current events in the Spanish- speaking world. They will continue to develop their ability to express themselves in speech and in writing and will develop greater ability to understand the speech of native speakers. This class is conducted entirely in Spanish.

AP Spanish Literature and Culture

AP Spanish Literature and Culture is the equivalent of a “Survey of Hispanic Literature” class, which is typically taken in the sixth semester of collegiate language studies. The course is designed to expose students to prominent literary works from Spain and Latin America, thereby preparing them for the Advanced Placement Examination in Spanish Literature. Literature encompassing various genres and authors from the Middle Ages to the present day will be covered in accordance with the reading list from the College Board. History, art, philosophy, geography, and other cultural topics will also be studied as they pertain to the reading list. Students will improve upon their written skills as they analyze literary works and write critically about them, and they will improve upon their oral/aural skills by critiquing and discussing the works in class. This course is conducted entirely in Spanish.

Italian

Italian I Honors

In these courses, students begin to develop the four basic skills of language acquistion: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to basic vocabulary and grammatical structures and are able, in a limited way, to express themselves orally and in writing in the present and perfect tenses. Aspects of Italian culture, art, geography, history, and other related topics will be presented. Performance-based activities and assessments will be integrated into the program which has as its goal the development of communicative competence.

AP Italian I

In these courses, students begin to develop the four basic skills of language acquistion: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to basic vocabulary and grammatical structures and are able, in a limited way, to express themselves orally and in writing in the present and perfect tenses. Aspects of Italian culture, art, geography, history, and other related topics will be presented. Performance-based activities and assessments will be integrated into the program which has as its goal the development of communicative competence.

Italian II

This course begins with a thorough review of Italian I. Students learn to express themselves in the past tenses and begin to use more complex grammatical structures. They develop a large vocabulary to address familiar topics such as jobs, traveling, foods, the weekend, and social situations. They listen to native speakers on CDs and continue their study of Italian culture. Performance- based activities and assessments will be integrated into the program.

Italian II Honors

After a thorough review of Italian I, students will learn to express themselves in the present, past, and future as well as give commands. They begin to use more complex grammatical structures including pronouns, negative expressions, comparisons of adjectives, demonstratives and adverbs. Their vocabulary expands to address a wider vareity of topics inlcuding jobs, travel, food, shopping, and weather. The use of CDs and videos gives students the opportunity to listen to the speech of native speakers. Students are given increased opportunities to practice their writing and speaking skills using performance-based and communicative-based activities and assessments and they continue to learn more about Italian culture.

Faculty

 

Department Chair


Daniel A. Ranalli
(2005)
B.A. and M.E.d. Loyola University Maryland, M.A., St. Louis University
443-841-3624       

 

Faculty


Carlos E. Bahamon
(2009)
B. A., Universidad del Tolima
443-841-3        

Rossana A. Barbera (2012)
Universitá Degli Studi Firenze; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University
443-841-3392       


Kelly M. Breschi
(1984)
B.A., Frostburg State College; M.M.S., Loyola University Maryland
443-841-3620       

Bethany Gentry (2014)

443-841-3200         


John B. Jenkins, Jr.
(2013)
B.A., St. Joseph’s University
443-841-3632       


Elayne Z. Melanson
(1999)
B.A., Loyola University Maryland Robert P. Moore (1989) B.S.F.S., Georgetown; M.S., University of Wisconsin (Madison)
443-841-3622       

 


Isabelino S. Prieto-Alonso
(2009)
B.A., University of Salamanca (Spain)
443-841-3312