Mathematics

The Mathematics Department at Loyola Blakefield is committed to the personal growth of the student in the context of the Ignatian Tradition. We intend that students will develop the integrity and skills to continue on at the college level. Our department recognizes individual abilities at all levels, and we expect all students to acquire fundamental math skills which include critical thinking and technological competence. We want students to acquire skills in respectful collaboration and cooperation and to take responsibility for their own learning. Students will also develop an appreciation of mathematics through an understanding of its role in other disciplines and in society.

A Loyola student is expected to become competent in the study of Algebra and Geometry. A completion of the study of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and Pre-Calculus is required of all students in the College Prep Program. The sequence of courses will vary depending on each student’s ninth-grade placement. All students will take a full-year Geometry course no later than the 10th grade.

Honors and AP level placement is determined by student achievement. In general, a student in an Honors course needs to maintain at least a B average throughout the year to be recommended for a Honors course the following year. A student in a College Prep course must maintain an A average to be recommended for a Honors course the following year.

Most courses require the student to have a graphing calculator. The department uses Texas Instrument calculators.

Available Courses

Items with (*) are electives

Mathematics

Advanced Mathematics 6

Students entering this course must have an accelerated level of proficiency in basic mathematical skills and their applications. Students must be able to independently process and reason mathematically. Topics include: a review of basic skills, real numbers, proportional reasoning, two- and three-dimensional geometry, probability, statistics, and the use of variables in expressions and equations.

Mathematics 6

This course is designed for students to acquire the advanced computational and reasoning skills to be successful in future mathematics courses. There is an emphasis on problem solving and applications. Topics include: a review of whole numbers, fractions and decimals, ratio, proportion, percent, basic geometry, and an introduction to algebraic thinking and skills.

Advanced Mathematics 7

Students entering this course must have demonstrated proficiency in the Mathematics 6 curriculum. Topics include: a review and extension of ratio, proportion and percent, geometry, probability, data analysis and rational numbers. This course will also include elementary algebra topics necessary for success in Algebra I.

Mathematics 7

This course is similar in content to Mathematics 7 Advanced, but more opportunity will be given for review and practice of previous mathematics topics. Students successfully completing this course may be placed in pre-algebra or Algebra I with the teacher's recommendation.

Pre-Algebra 8

This course provides a review and reinforcement of middle school mathematics with special focus on the tools of algebra.Students will make the connection between general mathematics topics and algebra.

Available Courses

Items with (*) are electives

Algebra

Algebra I

This course is an introduction to sets, number systems and their properties, algebraic operations, functions, graphing, formal mathematical structures, and elementary applications.

Algebra II

The course covers a review of sets, number systems, graphing, algebraic operations and linear functions. Students will use statistics and modeling to learn the properties of quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions as well as trigonometric functions and introduction to analytic geometry. A calculator is required and functions will be analyzed from numerical, graphical and analytical points of view.

Algebra II Honors

The course covers a review of sets, number systems, graphing, algebraic operations and linear functions. Students will use statistics and modeling to learn the properties of quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions as well as trigonometric functions and introduction to analytic geometry. A calculator is required and functions will be analyzed from numerical, graphical and analytical points of view.

Geometry

Geometry

Students will be introduced to formal logic and proof, spatial properties and relationships in two and three dimensions. Students will learn by explanation and will learn to make and test conjectures. All students will learn to operate the computer to facilitate their learning.

Geometry Honors

Students will be introduced to formal logic and proof, spatial properties and relationships in two and three dimensions. Students will learn by explanation and will learn to make and test conjectures. All students will learn to operate the computer to facilitate their learning.

Precalculus

Precalculus

Students will focus on algebraic functions of all types (polynomial and rational, and especially trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic and other inverses). Solving equations, including parametric equations, equations in polar coordinates and systems of equations will be thoroughly covered. The approach will be graphic, with daily use of the graphing calculator to assist in problem solving, modeling, exploring and visualizing the mathematics. The college prep course will cover all the material necessary for success in Calculus. The honors course will begin with topics from discrete mathematics and statistics and will cover all the material more rapidly and intensively.

Precalculus Honors

Students will focus on algebraic functions of all types (polynomial and rational, and especially trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic and other inverses). Solving equations, including parametric equations, equations in polar coordinates and systems of equations will be thoroughly covered. The approach will be graphic, with daily use of the graphing calculator to assist in problem solving, modeling, exploring and visualizing the mathematics. The college prep course will cover all the material necessary for success in Calculus. The honors course will begin with topics from discrete mathematics and statistics and will cover all the material more rapidly and intensively.

Advanced Precalculus Honors

Students will focus on algebraic functions of all types (polynomial and rational, and especially trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic and other inverses). Solving equations, including parametric equations, equations in polar coordinates and systems of equations will be thoroughly covered. The approach will be graphic, with daily use of the graphing calculator to assist in problem solving, modeling, exploring and visualizing the mathematics. The college prep course will cover all the material necessary for success in Calculus. The honors course will begin with topics from discrete mathematics and statistics and will cover all the material more rapidly and intensively.

College Algebra & Trigonometry

College Algebra and Trigonometry

This course is similar to Precalculus, yet focuses more on the Algebra concepts. The student will explore many new topics as well as extend those that have been studied in previous courses. The goal of this course is to help students gain a clear, interesting, and relevant understanding of the use of Algebra as well as develop an understanding of trigonometry. Many real-world applications of the topics will be studied.

Discrete Mathematics

Discrete Mathematics

Students in this course will apply the concepts and methods of mathematics to model and explore a variety of practical situations.Discrete topics include: graph theory, matrix models, planning and scheduling, map coloring, social decision making, and probability. Students will also study descriptive and inferential statistics. The prerequisite for this course is Algebra II. This course is designed for students who will undertake higher level math in college that may not include Calculus.

Calculus

Calculus I

This course is similar to AP Calculus AB but will proceed through the material more slowly. Students will cover only the basics of differentiation and integration.

AP Calculus AB

This is a college level treatment of differential and integral Calculus and analytic geometry. It is designed for highly motivated students of proven ability in mathematics. The permission of the Department Chair is required to enroll in this course. The material is approached from graphical, numerical and analytical points of view. A graphing calculator is required. Students are expected to take the Calculus AB Advanced Placement Examination.

AP Calculus BC

This course is a continuation and enhancement of Calculus I. The course covers all of the topics of BC Advanced Placement Calculus not previously covered in Calculus I, including sequences, series, polar and parametric equations and advanced techniques of integration. Students are expected to take the Calculus BC Advanced Placement Examination.

AP Statistics

Advanced Placement Statistics

This is a college level treatment of statistics designed to lead to Advanced Placement credit. The students will learn to collect and analyze data, design studies and interpret results. Individual and group projects will be required. The Math Department recommends that AP Statistics be taken in addition to, not instead of, an Algebra-based Math course.

Engineering

Introduction to Engineering

The course will allow students to learn introductory concepts, methods and principles of engineering practice. The course will focus on using an engineering perspective to view and solve a problem with an integrated approach. Students will be required to design, plan, and communicate, while solving problems and considering the ethics and professionalism that would be required.

Faculty

 

Department Chair


William G. Koffel
(2008)
B.S., Lehigh University; M.A.T., Loyola University Maryland
443-841-3216         

 

Faculty


Jose M. Albornoz, Jr.
(1985)
B.S., M.Ed., M.S., Loyola University Maryland
443-841-3220          


Erin A. Courtney
(2002)
B.A., Washington College; Masters Equivalence, Loyola University Maryland
443-841-3346          


Lawrence J. Jarcewski
(2005)
B.A., Towson University;M.A., Loyola University Maryland
443-841-3446         


Megan A. Kurtzman
(2013)
B.A., High Point University
443-841-3222         


Sylvie K. Nkere
(2011)
B.S., University of Kinshasa; M.S., The Johns Hopkins University
443-841-3630         

Katherine L. Preis (1983)
B.S., Towson University; M.Ed., Loyola University Maryland
443-841-3436         


Laura L. Reid
(2004)
B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.Ed., Loyola University Maryland
443-841-3420         


Gayle M. Smith
(2001)
B.A., M.A.T., Binghamton University
443-841-3234         


Erin D. Warfield
(2001)
B.S., M.A.L.S., Loyola University Maryland
443-841-3361