Available Courses

Items with (*) are electives

Latin

Latin 07

The student is introduced to the basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary of the Latin language through translations and readings. Some attention is given to the history of Rome and to classical antiquities.

Classical Languages

Items with (*) are electives

Greek

Greek I Honors

Students will begin to immerse themselves in Greek by becoming familiar with the sights and sounds of a new alphabet. The rudiments of Greek grammar will be covered and continuously reviewed. Engaging reading passages that become increasingly complex as the course progresses will be enjoyed from the very start. Daily participation in class will involve speaking, reading aloud, composing sentences, and helping to facilitate classroom activities. The course will include several creative research projects in addition to traditional assessments. A field trip will be taken either to the Greek Orthodox Cathedral, The Walters Art Museum, or the Baltimore Art Museum.

Greek II Honors

This intermediate course is a continuation of Honors Greek I, which covers the rudiments of grammar and syntax. The authentic ancient Greek readings in the textbook represent a variety of genres, authors, and time periods from comedy to epic, Aelian to Xenophon, and archaic times to the Roman period. Students will become increasingly comfortable with reading prose passages both at sight and with vocabulary. The course will include several creative research projects in addition to traditional assessments. A class competition of Greek orthography will be held in the spring and a field trip will be taken either to the Greek Orthodox Cathedral, The Walters Art Museum, or the Baltimore Art Museum.

Greek III Honors

The most advanced Greek course offered expects students to focus on one literary text at a time by reading, discussing, and analyzing the work both in its own historical context and within the classical tradition. Authors and works may vary from year to year based on student interest but are likely to include Lysias, Plato, Herodotus, Xenophon, and the New Testament.

Latin

Latin I

The student is introduced to the basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary of the Latin language through translations and readings. Some attention is given to the history of Rome and to classical antiquities.

Latin I Honors

The student is introduced to the basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary of the Latin language through translations and readings. Some attention is given to the history of Rome and to classical antiquities.

Latin II

A review of Latin I is followed by the presentation of further grammar. Transitional readings in mythology and Roman civilization are followed by selections from Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic Wars and from other intermediate synthetic and original texts.

Latin II Honors

A review of Latin I is followed by the presentation of further grammar. Transitional readings in mythology and Roman civilization are followed by selections from Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic Wars and from other intermediate synthetic and original texts.

Latin III

After a review of grammar, these courses are designed to develop further the student's reading ability in Latin. Selections are chosen from various genres.

Latin III Honors

After a review of grammar, these courses are designed to develop further the student's reading ability in Latin. Selections are chosen from various genres.

Latin IV Honors

This course is a survey of Roman authors from every age, both poetry and prose. Authors will include, but are not limited to, Vergil, Cicero, Ovid, Horace, and Catullus. Students will learn the development of Roman values and their influence on Western civilization, as well as the craft of Roman poets through the study of word arrangement, scansion, and literary devices.

AP Latin

This college-level course involves the reading in Latin of sections of Books I, II, IV, VI, X and XII of Vergil's Aeneid. Students become familiar with the metrical and other stylistic devices used by the poet in his epic. Pertinent Roman cultural, social and political history and the study of the ancient epic as a literary genre are also components of this course. At its conclusion students will take the College Board's Advanced Placement examination.

Faculty

 

Department Chair

Robert J. Wright (2000)
B. A., M.A.L.S., Loyola University Maryland
443-841-3570      

 

Faculty


Lloyd D. George, S.J.
(1967)
B.A., M.A., Fordham; M.Div., Woodstock
443-841-3642      


Julie A. Meyer
(2013)
B.A., College of the Holy Cross; M.A., Boston College
443-841-3634      


Elizabeth S. Olson
(2013)
B.A., University of Richmond; M.A., Boston University
443-841-3636